Random Justice | Zookal Textbooks | Zookal Textbooks
  • Author(s) Neil Duxbury
  • Edition
  • Published1st October 2002
  • PublisherOxford University Press UK
  • ISBN9780199253531
This controversial book explores the potential for the use of lotteries in social, and particularly legal, decision-making contexts. Utilizing a variety of disciplines and materials, the author considers in detail the history, advantages, and drawbacks of deciding issues of social significance by lot and argues that the value of the lottery as a legal decision-making device has generally been underestimated. The final chapter of the book considers how lotteries might be combined with other decision-mechanisms and suggests that it may sometimes be sensible to require that adjudication takes place in the shadow of the lottery.

Random Justice

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  • Author(s) Neil Duxbury
  • Edition
  • Published1st October 2002
  • PublisherOxford University Press UK
  • ISBN9780199253531
This controversial book explores the potential for the use of lotteries in social, and particularly legal, decision-making contexts. Utilizing a variety of disciplines and materials, the author considers in detail the history, advantages, and drawbacks of deciding issues of social significance by lot and argues that the value of the lottery as a legal decision-making device has generally been underestimated. The final chapter of the book considers how lotteries might be combined with other decision-mechanisms and suggests that it may sometimes be sensible to require that adjudication takes place in the shadow of the lottery.
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